E-M2 and subclades outside of west Africa

E1b1a1f1 (P252/U174)

Y-DNA E

E1b1a in North Africa++

Tuareg from Al Awaynat and Tahala, Libya 46.5% (20/43)
Ottoni, Claudio; Maarten H.D. Larmuseau, Nancy Vanderheyden, Cristina Martínez-Labarga, Giuseppina Primativo, Gianfranco Biondi, Ronny Decorte, Olga Rickards (10 Feb 2011). “Deep into the roots of the Libyan Tuareg: A genetic survey of their paternal heritage” (Epub). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 145 (1): 118–124. doi:10.1002/ajpa.21473. PMID 21312181. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1…21473/abstract.
Oran, Algeria 8.6% (8/93)
^ Robino, Carlos; F. Crobu, C. Di Gaetano, A. Bekada, S. Benhamamouch, N. Cerutti, A. Piazza, S. Inturri and C. Torre (31 August 2007). “Analysis of Y-chromosomal SNP haplogroups and STR haplotypes in an Algerian population sample” (Epub). International Journal of Legal Medicine 122 (3): 251–255. doi:10.1007/s00414-007-0203-5. PMID 17909833. http://www.springerlink.com/content/w218230060723252/.
Berbers, southern and north-central Morocco 9.5% (6/63)
Bosch, Elena; Francesc Calafell, David Comas, Peter J. Oefner, Peter A. Underhill, and Jaume Bertranpetit (April 2001). “High-Resolution Analysis of Human Y-Chromosome Variation Shows a Sharp Discontinuity and Limited Gene Flow between Northwestern Africa and the Iberian Peninsula”. American Journal of Human Genetics 68 (4): 1019–1029. doi:10.1086/319521. PMC 1275654. PMID 11254456. http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(07)61426-8. Retrieved 2010-09-22.
The publication refers to E1b1a as H22.
Morrocan Arabs 6.8% (3/44)
Bosch, Elena; Francesc Calafell, David Comas, Peter J. Oefner, Peter A. Underhill, and Jaume Bertranpetit (April 2001). “High-Resolution Analysis of Human Y-Chromosome Variation Shows a Sharp Discontinuity and Limited Gene Flow between Northwestern Africa and the Iberian Peninsula”. American Journal of Human Genetics 68 (4): 1019–1029. doi:10.1086/319521. PMC 1275654. PMID 11254456. http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(07)61426-8. Retrieved 2010-09-22.
Saharawis 3.5% (1/29)
Bosch, Elena; Francesc Calafell, David Comas, Peter J. Oefner, Peter A. Underhill, and Jaume Bertranpetit (April 2001). “High-Resolution Analysis of Human Y-Chromosome Variation Shows a Sharp Discontinuity and Limited Gene Flow between Northwestern Africa and the Iberian Peninsula”. American Journal of Human Genetics 68 (4): 1019–1029. doi:10.1086/319521. PMC 1275654. PMID 11254456. http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(07)61426-8. Retrieved 2010-09-22.
Egyptians 8.33% (3/36), 1.4% (2/147), and (0/73)
Luis, J.R.; D.J.Rowold (2004 March). “The Levant versus the Horn of Africa: Evidence for Bidirectional Corridors of Human Migrations”. The American Society of Human Genetics 74 (3): 532–544. doi:10.1086/382286. PMC 1182266. PMID 14973781. http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(07)61870-9. Retrieved 2010-09-20.
Karafet, Tatiana M.; .L. Zegura, O. Posukh, L. Osipova, A. Bergen, J. Long, D. Goldman, W. Klitz, S. Harihara, P. de Knijff, V. Wiebe, R.C. Griffiths, A.R. Templeton and M.F. Hammer (1999 March). “Ancestral Asian source(s) of new world Y-chromosome founder haplotypes” (Online). American Journal of Human Genetics 64 (3): 817–31. doi:10.1086/302282. PMC 1377800. PMID 10053017. http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(07)61720-0.
Arredi, Barbara; Estella S. Poloni, Silvia Paracchini, Tatiana Zerjal, Dahmani M. Fathallah, Mohamed Makrelouf, Vincenzo L. Pascali, Andrea Novelletto, and Chris Tyler-Smith (2004 August 1). “A Predominantly Neolithic Origin for Y-Chromosomal DNA Variation in North Africa” (online). American Journal of Human Genetics 75 (2): 338–345. doi:10.1086/423147.
Tunisians 1.4% (2/148)
Arredi, Barbara; Estella S. Poloni, Silvia Paracchini, Tatiana Zerjal, Dahmani M. Fathallah, Mohamed Makrelouf, Vincenzo L. Pascali, Andrea Novelletto, and Chris Tyler-Smith (2004 August 1). “A Predominantly Neolithic Origin for Y-Chromosomal DNA Variation in North Africa” (online). American Journal of Human Genetics 75 (2): 338–345. doi:10.1086/423147.

E1b1a in Eurasia

Screenshot (34)

Saudi Arabians 7.6% (12/157)
^ Abu-Amero, Khaled; Ali Hellani, Ana M González, Jose M Larruga, Vicente M Cabrera and Peter A Underhill (22 September 2009). “Saudi Arabian Y-Chromosome diversity and its relationship with nearby regions” (online). BMC Genetics 10: 59. doi:10.1186/1471-2156-10-59. PMC 2759955. PMID 19772609. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2156/10/59.
Omanis 6.6% (8/121)
Luis, J.R.; D.J.Rowold (2004 March). “The Levant versus the Horn of Africa: Evidence for Bidirectional Corridors of Human Migrations”. The American Society of Human Genetics 74 (3): 532–544. doi:10.1086/382286. PMC 118 2266. PMID 14973781. http://www.cell.com/AJHG/abstract/S0002-9297(07)61870-9. Retrieved 2010-09-20.
Emiratis 5.5% (9/164)
Cadenas, Alicia M.; Lev A Zhivotovsky, Luca L Cavalli-Sforza, Peter A Underhill and Rene J Herrera (10 October 2007). “Y-chromosome diversity characterizes the Gulf of Oman” (Online). European Journal of Human Genetics 16 (3): 374–386. doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201934. PMID 17928816
Yemenis 4.8% (3/62)
Cadenas, Alicia M.; Lev A Zhivotovsky, Luca L Cavalli-Sforza, Peter A Underhill and Rene J Herrera (10 October 2007). “Y-chromosome diversity characterizes the Gulf of Oman” (Online). European Journal of Human Genetics 16 (3): 374–386. doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201934. PMID 17928816
Majorcans 3.2% (2/62)
Adams, Susan M.; Elena Bosch, Patricia L. Balaresque, Stéphane J. Ballereau, Andrew C. Lee, Eduardo Arroyo, Ana M. López-Parra, Mercedes Aler, Marina S. Gisbert Grifo, Maria Brion, Angel Carracedo, João Lavinha, Begoña Martínez-Jarreta, Lluis Quintana-Murci, Antònia Picornell, Misericordia Ramon, Karl Skorecki, Doron M. Behar, Francesc Calafell and Mark A. Jobling (4 December 2008). “The Genetic Legacy of Religious Diversity and Intolerance: Paternal Lineages of Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula” (online). The American Journal of Human Genetics 83 (6): 725–736. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2008.11.007. PMC 2668061. PMID 19061982. http://www.cell.com/AJHG/fulltext/S0002-9297(08)00592-2.
Qataris 4.2% (3/72)
Cadenas, Alicia M.; Lev A Zhivotovsky, Luca L Cavalli-Sforza, Peter A Underhill and Rene J Herrera (10 October 2007). “Y-chromosome diversity characterizes the Gulf of Oman” (Online). European Journal of Human Genetics 16 (3): 374–386. doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201934. PMID 17928816
Southern Iranians 1.7% (2/117)
Regueiro M, Cadenas AM, Gayden T, Underhill PA, Herrera RJ (2006). “Iran: tricontinental nexus for Y-chromosome driven migration”. Hum. Hered. 61 (3): 132–43. doi:10.1159/000093774. PMID 16770078
Iraqis 1.4% (2/139)
Al-Zahery, N; O. Semino, G. Benuzzi, C. Magri, G. Passarino,A. Torroni, and A.S. Santachiara-Benerecetti (September 2003). “Y-chromosome and mtDNA polymorphisms in Iraq, a crossroad of the early human dispersal and of post-Neolithic migrations” (Online). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 28 (3): 458–472. doi:10.1016/S1055-7903(03)00039-3. PMID 12927131. http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retri…55790303000393.
Pakistanis 1.4% (9/638)
Firasat Sadaf, Khaliq Shagufta, Mohyuddin Aisha et al. (2007). “Y-chromosomal evidence for a limited Greek contribution to the Pathan population of Pakistan”. European Journal of Human Genetics 15 (1): 121–126. doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201726. PMC 2588664. PMID 17047675.
Istanbul, Turkey 1.2% (1/81)
Cinnioglu, Cengiz; Roy King, Toomas Kivisild, Ersi Kalfoglu, Sevil Atasoy, Gianpiero L. Cavalleri, Anita S. Lillie, CharlesC. Roseman, Alice A. Lin and Kristina Prince (2004 Jan). “Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia”. Human Genetics 114 (2): 127–148. doi:10.1007/s00439-003-1031-4. PMID 14586639. http://www.springerlink.com/content/q884mpdr929yuye0/.
Turkish Cypriots 4.3% (?/?)
Cinnioglu, Cengiz; Roy King, Toomas Kivisild, Ersi Kalfoglu, Sevil Atasoy, Gianpiero L. Cavalleri, Anita S. Lillie, CharlesC. Roseman, Alice A. Lin and Kristina Prince (2004 Jan). “Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia”. Human Genetics 114 (2): 127–148. doi:10.1007/s00439-003-1031-4. PMID 14586639. http://www.springerlink.com/content/q884mpdr929yuye0/.

E1b1a in Europe

2% in Southern Portugal
4% in Northern Portugal
Cruciani et al. 2004
http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpE.html
Adams et al, The Genetic Legacy of Religious Diversity and Intolerance: Paternal Lineages of Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula, American Journal of Human Genetics, 83(6): 725-36, 2008.

Haplogroup-E-z365

The initial invading North African force was between 10,000 and 15,000 strong, the scale of subsequent migration and settlement is uncertain, with some claiming numbers in the hundreds of thousands.20 Islamization of the populace after the invasion was certainly rapid, but it has been argued that this reflects an exponential social process of religious conversion rather than a substantial immigration;21 a sizeable proportion of the indigenous population (the so-called Mozarabs) was allowed to retain its Christian practices, as a result of the religious tolerance of the Muslim rulers.22 There is also doubt about the extent of intermarriage between indigenous people and settlers in the early phase.20 After the overthrow of Islamic rule in most of the peninsula, a period of tolerant coexistence (convivencia) ensued in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, but after 1492 (1496 in Portugal), religious intolerance forced Spanish Muslims to either convert to Christianity (as so-called moriscos) or leave.23 After the fifteenth century, moriscos were relocated across Spain on occasion, and, finally, during 1609–1616, over 200,000 were expelled, mostly from Valencia.”

“The people encountered by the Islamic invaders in the eighth century were not a religiously and culturally uniform group; they included among the Catholic Christian majority a substantial minority of Jewish people. They and their descendants are known as Sephardic Jews, from Sepharad, the Hebrew word for Spain. The Jewish presence was very long-established, with some evidence that it predated the Christian era; many Jews, however, are thought to have arrived during the Roman period, either voluntarily or as slaves brought from the Middle East after the defeat of Judea in 70 CE.24 The later arrival of others was due to their displacement by the Islamic invasion of their homelands in the Near East. Under the final years of Visigothic rule, the Jews suffered the first of a long series of persecutions, including forced religious conversion.

It has been estimated that during the convivencia, their population size in Spain was around 100,000.25 In the late 14th century, a wave of pogroms affected the main Jewish quarters in Iberian cities, particularly Barcelona and Girona. One estimate26 gives a Spanish Jewish population of 400,000 by the time of the expulsions of the late fifteenth century, during which some 160,000 Spanish Jews were expelled, largely settling around the Mediterranean, while the remainder underwent conversion to Christianity, living as so-called conversos (in Spain) or cristãos novos (in Portugal).”

20. Guichard P. Barral Editores; Barcelona: 1976. Al-Andalus: Estructura antropologica de una sociedade islamica en Occidente.
21. Bulliet R.W. Harvard University Press; Cambridge, MA: 1979. Conversion to Islam in the medieval period: an essay in quantitative history.
22. Anon. (1147) De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi, codex 470, folios 125–146. Corpus Christi College Library, University of Cambridge.
23. Harvey L.P. University of Chicago Press; Chicago: 2005. Muslims in Spain: 1500 to 1614.
24. Gerber J.S. The Free Press; New York: 1992. The Jews of Spain: a History of the Sephardic Experience.
25. Mackay A. The Jews in Spain during the Middle Ages. In: Kedourie E., editor. Spain and the Jews: the Sephardi Experience, 1492 and after. Thames and Hudson; London: 1992.
26. Caro Baroja J. Istmo; Madrid: 1978. Los judios en la España moderna y contemporanea, Volume 1. pp. 198–205.
E-V38(E1b1a) is found in 8.4% of Sephardic Jews
(Source: “History in the Interpretation of the Patten of p49a, f RFLP Y-Chromosome Variation in Egypt: A Consideration of Multiple Lines of Evidence TaqI” Keita, 2005)
Haplogroup E-M2 (former E1b1a) and haplogroup E-M329 (former E1b1c) are now united by the mutations V38 and V100

Some matches and their stories from Nat Geo (I omitted their names due to privacy reasons)
My paternal line comes from southern France. The earliest written record comes from the Druin Collection of French-Canadian Catholic Church records. My 10th Great Grandmother’s maiden name is Limousin. My next task is to find written records from Perigueux, France to validate that is indeed where my paternal ancestry came from. Perigueux is about an hour or two west northwest of Lascaux caves.

 

All of my ancestors as far back as known are from the British Isles. My great grand father on my father’s side was Pemberton. Even though on the paternal side as far back as 3 or 4 thousand years ago show an area of southwest Africa my analysis shows no African . How that happened I don’t understand unless it was earlier slave trade to Egypt or Rome. Northern European 42% Mediterranean 34% Southwest Asian 20% . 1.4% Neanderthal, .8 Denivision I recently discovered through Family Tree that there is a more than likely chance my last name should be Brandon or Brannum or some derivative. My oldest known Y chromosome came from Yorkshire England in 1627 Branham .

Father is reported to be Italian. I was adopted and this information was given to me by the agency handling my adoption. Sub-Saharian Africa 34%, N European 26%, Mediterranean 22%, Southwest Asian 12%, South African 3%, Northeast Asian 2%, Native American 2%. E-U186

DNA doesn’t lie, 2016. My father’s father was British. I’m 33% Great Britain, Ireland, Southern and Eastern Europe. My father was born 1910 in Arkansas, United States. The story is his mother (who was a Creole) was a mistress and born 3 children with the British man, but in those days interracial mix was not allowed. She used the last name of another man. I’m 82 and my baby sister ordered a kit to test our deep ancestry.

I’ve followed the genealogy of my paternal line back in time, and from Oklahoma to Indiana to Ohio to Virginia. I’ve confirmed a common ancestor, William Burke (1752-1803), born in Virginia and fought in the Revolutionary War, by genetic comparison with a descendant of another of William’s son’s. This paternal line has been considered ‘white’ European for all the generations that I’ve discovered. There is no reportable African DNA in the autosomal DNA analysis by Geno or 23&me for me and my cousins, so the African connection appears to be distant and is preserved only in the YDNA. Even so, I would love to know more about my African ancestors and find my closest African American relatives.

Father, paternal grandmother and grandfather from Belmonte Calabro, a town in the province of Cosenza in the Calabria region of southern Italy.

We are the Ancient Ones!!

E the ancients

7 comments on “E-M2 and subclades outside of west Africa

  1. As with you, my haplogroup assignment via NGS is E-U186 and FTDNA E-U174 (terminal SNP CST923/M4670). I have three exact matches (low resolution, 12 Markers) from France, Ghana, and Scotland. The rest are mostly (12) located in and around the Arabian Peninsula (with 1 genetic difference).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s